This course offers students the ability to analyze important issues in international economics at the intermediate level. The course consists of two parts. The first part covers international trade. This part deals with the reasons why countries trade with each other, the welfare and distributional effects of international trade, and the consequences of international trade policies. The second part introduces international macroeconomics. It deals with global imbalances, exchange rates, and international macroeconomic policy. The course also discusses recent international trade disputes.

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This course presents students with the foundations of applied microeconomic analysis from the perspective of managerial decision-making.
The course focuses on the following topics: Consumer behavior and demand, firm behavior and production, market equilibrium and strategic interaction (i.e., basics of game theory). The course also covers certain specialized topics and applications concerning firm behavior, such as market power and structure, advertising, product quality, entry and innovation.

The course presents students with the necessary theoretical foundations for subsequent analytical studies of markets and strategic competition and for empirical and econometric analyses of consumer and firm behavior, in spirit of modern industrial organization.
This course consists of two parts: The first part concentrates on microeconomics of consumer and firm behavior. This part also introduces basics of game theory and how game theoretic tools can be used to analyze strategic interdependence. The second part deals with sources of market power, product quality and information. In this part, we also analyze economic mechanisms at work when firms enter markets and when firms make R&D decisions and protect their innovations.

The course aims to support the writing of the master's thesis in the major subject. During the course you receive support and individual counseling from your thesis supervisor for producing a thesis. You also get feedback from your co-students when presenting your own master thesis project in your seminar group. The course contains individual counselling and group discussions. During the course you will partly work on your own thesis, partly review and comment your co-student’s thesis projects.

Read more about the master’s thesis on the web.

How should organisations screen job applicants? Does privacy benefit consumers? And how should governments regulate public transportation companies? Information is crucial in many economic and organizational issues. This course introduces information economics at the intermediate level. The approach is both positive and normative. On the one hand, information economics is used to address positive questions about the rationale behind current business practices and government policies. On the other hand, understanding the trade-offs involved also allows to answer normative questions, such as on how incentives can be shaped to improve outcomes.

This course introduces students with the basics of econometric and data analysis, with special emphasis on modern applied micro-econometric methods. The aim of the course is to help students to build and develop skills needed to understand empirical methods that are used in modern applied economic research and to execute their own econometric projects.

The course focuses on the following topics and methods: randomized trials, regression, instrumental variables, regression-discontinuity designs, and differences-in-differences. We also explore a number of applications and discuss how micro-econometrics is related to machine learning techniques. The course also introduces students with econometric and statistical software, Stata in particular, and how it can be used in econometric and data analysis.

Note: This course is lectured simultaneously with the advanced level course, “Applied empirical methods in economics”. Bachelor students should take the intermediate level version (this course, 26030), master students the advanced level version (course code 26031).

This course presents students with the foundations of applied microeconomic analysis from the perspective of managerial decision-making.
The course focuses on the following topics: Consumer behavior and demand, firm behavior and production, market equilibrium and strategic interaction (i.e., basics of game theory). The course also covers certain specialized topics and applications concerning firm behavior, such as market power and structure, advertising, product quality, entry and innovation.

The course presents students with the necessary theoretical foundations for subsequent analytical studies of markets and strategic competition and for empirical and econometric analyses of consumer and firm behavior, in spirit of modern industrial organization.


This course consists of two parts: The first part concentrates on microeconomics of consumer and firm behavior. This part also introduces basics of game theory and how game theoretic tools can be used to analyze strategic interdependence. The second part deals with sources of market power, product quality and information. In this part, we also analyze economic mechanisms at work when firms enter markets and when firms make R&D decisions and protect their innovations.

During the course you will learn to understand the methods, central results, and theories of both experimental and psychological (behavioural) economics, and their relation to other fields of economics, and to microeconomics and industrial organization in particular. The course offers a master-level overview into behavioural decisions, behavioural games, dynamic behavioural decisions, experimental economics and experiment settings, as well as applications thereof.

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During the course, we will cover both applied and theoretical topics related to systemic risk and macroprudential policy. The course will cover general models and tools used in macro­ financial analysis and systemic risk measurement, as well as their relation to macroprudential policy objectives. Systemic risk models covered in include early-waming, contagion and stress-testing models. The course offers a master-level overview into systemic risk, macroprudential policy, and macro-finance, as well as applications thereof.

Curriculum short version.pdfCurriculum short version.pdf

This course presents a modern approach to the economic analysis of competition policy with an emphasis on a European perspective. The participants are expected to have some knowledge of elementary models
associated with the economics of strategy (game theory and oligopoly models). The course will focus on the following issues:
- the definition of a relevant market,
-horizontal agreements, collusion and the enforcement of cartel laws,
-vertical agreements,
-concerted practices with a particular focus on the exchange of information between competitors,
-evaluations of mergers,
-market dominance and business practices for the abuse of dominance,
-strategic creation of switching costs and loyalty-enhancing pricing strategies
-price discrimination with a particular focus on history-based pricing
- competition policy for innovative industries
- the relationship between intellectual property rights and competition policy
-the relationship between competition policy and sector-specific regulation.

The course is linked to the contemporary legal frameworks in Europe, but is not a course in competition law. The course will present topical European competition cases and present an overview of the main methods used to evaluate competition policy cases.

Kursen är avsedd att stöda de studerandes skrivande av kandidatavhandling. I kursen ingår litteratursökning, datainsamling, repetition och påbyggnad av kunskaper i ekonometri och matematik.